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MHI-PAC

Frequently Asked Questions

Print Version

The Technical Activities Department receives numerous, daily phone inquiries concerning the design, construction and enforcement issues relating to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Developmentís (HUDís) federally mandated manufactured housing program. This program consists of the Manufactured Home Construction and Safety Standards (MHCSS), commonly called the HUD Code and the Manufactured Home Procedural and Enforcement Regulations (MHPER). Some of the more commonly received questions are answered below. If your question is not found in the listing, contact the Technical Activities Department at (703) 558-0400.

Where can I obtain copies of the HUD Code and the enforcement regulations?

What is the difference between a manufactured home, a modular home and a panelized home?

Do I have a manufactured or a mobile home?

Where can I locate the manufacturer of my manufactured home?

Do alterations, additions or repairs have to conform to the HUD Code requirements?

Are there any documents available that compare the HUD Code to any model building code?

What is a D-sticker home?

What is PB plumbing pipe and where can I find more information concerning PB pipe claims?



Where can I obtain copies of the HUD Code and the enforcement regulations?

Copies of the HUD Code (MHCSS) and the enforcement regulations (MHPER) can be ordered from the National Conference of States on Building Codes and Standards (NCSBCS) at 505 Huntmar Park Drive, Suite 210, Herndon, Virginia, 20170, (703) 437-0100.

What is the difference between a manufactured home, a modular home and a panelized home?

Many types of structures are built in a factory and designed for long-term residential use. In the case of manufactured and modular homes, units are built in a factory, transported to the site location and installed. In panelized and pre-cut homes, essentially flat units (factory-built panels or factory-cut building materials) are transported to the site location and assembled.

The major difference is that manufactured homes are federally regulated by the HUD Code under 24 CFR 3280. The HUD Code provides the design and construction requirements for the complete production of the entire home in the factory, with some modifications permitted for on-site completion. Modular, panelized and pre-cut homes fall under the auspice of the model building code enforced in the jurisdiction where the home is to be located. These can be the BOCA National Building Code, the ICBO Uniform Building Code, The Southern Standard Building Code or the ICC One- and Two-Family Dwelling Code.

Do I have a manufactured or a mobile home?

The federal Manufactured Home Construction and Safety Standards (MHCSS), the HUD Code, went into effect on June 15, 1976. Manufactured homes are defined in the HUD Code. A factory-built home, which conforms to this definition, and produced after June 15, 1976, is commonly called a manufactured home. A factory-built home produced before June 15, 1976 is commonly called a mobile home or pre-HUD Code home.

Where can I locate the manufacturer of my manufactured home?

This is a common question we receive at MHI. It is extremely hard for the staff to adequately inform the caller if they only know the serial number, the brand name or the dimensions of the home. It is virtually impossible to inform the caller based on this information only. We suggest that you look for the "data plate". The data plate contains the manufacturerís name and address, the style of the home, what design conditions the home was built to conform to, appliance installation system identification and other pertinent information about the home. The data plate must be permanently affixed to the manufactured home. It can be found near the electrical junction box (circuit breaker) of the home. Other locations might be on a kitchen cabinet door or inside a bedroom closet. It is usually placed out of ordinary view by the residents. Please be advised, that data plates were not officially required on manufactured homes until the enactment of the HUD Code back in June 1976.

Do alterations, additions or repairs have to conform to the HUD Code requirements?

The HUD Code is strictly for the manufacture of the home itself. Once the home has received the HUD label from the In-Plant Primary Inspection Agency (IPIA), it is transported to the retailer/dealer lot or directly to the site location. Some minor completion of the home is permitted at the site. However, once the home has been sited, that is as far as the HUD Code goes. State or local building codes would apply to additions, alterations or repairs to the sited home. This could include attaching a garage to the home, the installation of decks around the home or any alterations to the interior of the home.

Are there any documents available that compare the HUD Code to any model building code?

MHI has a study that was prepared in December 1997, that provides a comparison of the HUD Code with the 1995 CABO One and Two-Family Dwelling Code. Items that are addressed are structural considerations, fire safety, accessibility, energy design, plumbing systems, mechanical systems and electrical requirements.

What is a D-sticker home?

A D-sticker home is designed to meet the wind requirements of ASCE 7-88 exposure D criteria. ASCE 7 is a reference standard contained in the HUD Code. It is specifically for homes to be sited within 1,500 feet of a coastline in hurricane wind prone areas of the country.

What is PB plumbing pipe and where can I find more information concerning PB pipe claims?

Polybutylene (PB) plumbing systems were installed in several million homes in the late 1970ís, 1980ís and early 1990ís. These plumbing systems were also installed in many manufactured homes in the same time frame. Problems have arisen over the years with leaking plumbing systems using PB piping. A class action suite was brought against several manufacturers and distributors of these systems. PB piping can be identified as blue plastic pipe in the yard that delivers water from the curbside meter to the home or as grey plastic pipe installed inside the home that is connected by grey or copper fittings. Two information centers are identified to assist in the claims process for homeowners who are experiencing leaks and are available to expedite the handling of claims. The Consumer Plumbing Recovery Center (CPRC) at (800) 356-3496 is one such group that handles all different types of PB piping. If for some reason your home does not fall under the CPRC guidelines and they decline your request for help, you may contact the U.S. Brass Trust. The Brass Trust is NOT affiliated with U.S. Brass--it was set up in 1998 when the Bankfuptcy Court judge ruled that U.S. Brass (in chapter 11 bankruptcy at that time) could not handle any polybutylene plumbing claims.

Contact the U.S. Brass Trust at 1-800-622-0130. There will be a recording that will give you the information on how to file a claim.

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